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of mission there on a tour of u.n. bases in north kivu province. >> reporter: in the eastern part of the democratic republic of the congo, united nations peacekeepers are facing fresh challenges to their 10-year mission here. how sosecure mims of people as fighting has -- to secure millions of people as fighting has flared up in recent months. over five million have died as a result of this conduct fueled by rivalries. as many as 35,000 in the last month alone. the u.n. has in fact come under intense criticism for failing to adequately respond to the latest wave of violence against civilians, something that is at the core of its mandate here. >> our first challenge is protection. protection of civilian populations. and that's a huge challenge because of the size and complexity of the country -- this area alone, where we're focusing on right now is the size of california. >> alan doss is the u.n. mission chief in congo, under pressure to address the deteriorating security situation this spring, he traveled to the front lines for a firsthand assessment. high in the air it becomes im
is timed to start with the u.n. general assembly meeting. while the white house won't deny it, there is no confirmation either. >> we are certainly hopeful that progress is being made. >> meanwhile, a new poll suggests president obama's star is falling among israeli jews, the number who consider him pro israeli is down 4% according to the jerusalem post t was 31% in may. >> right now, barack obama has an israel problem, and the fact is he's going to have to find a way to fix it, and that may well create another problem. >> mr. obama's numbers slumed after his june speech to the muslim world but the state department shrugged it off. >> the people in israel know who stands with them. >> former president bush was hugely p pro israeli but it was two and a half years into his administration before he convened a middle east peace process, the 9/11 attacks providing a distraction and justification. president obama has condemned israel's continued settlement building and the israelis want to suspend it as a a pre-condition. some experts say they ought to negotiate with israel and the
for a long-range missile test. and led to tough new u.n. sanctions being imposed. the south rejected any comparison, however, insisting his rocket is part of the peaceful civilian state program. -- its rocket is part of the peaceful civilian state program. but perhaps p'yongyang will not be complaining too loudly. in recent days, it is seemingly trying to lower attention. this weekend, senior north korean officials made a rare visit to seoul, south korea, holding their first talks with the south koreans. >> the latest headlines for you on bbc world news. a strong challenge for karzai from his rival, of del. the u.s. is facing its biggest deficit since world war ii, $9 trillion over the next 10 years. new trials are starting in iran, the opposition, foreign governments and the u.n. cobham show trials. -- call them show trials. >> they are becoming familiar scenes. in an iranian courthouse, row upon row of opposition figures, academics and to journalists in blue prison uniforms. they are accused of stirring up the post-election demonstrationsç and conspiring with foreign powers. iranian
for american trps in the eight- year afan war; a new report from the u.n.'s nucle watchdog found iran has notuspended its nucle activities. and californigovernor arnold schwarnegger declared a state of emergency for both nterey and los angeles couies after wildfires burned thousandof acres. on newsur.pbs.org, an online- only feature tonit-- an "art bt" conversation i had with josh neufeld, ahor of the new graphic novel, "a.-- after the luge-- "four years after katrina flooded new orans." here's a srt excerpt. >> what i did in ad was ttell the stories of seven diffent people, real new orlns, actual livin breathing human beings who survived katrin it was something that wanted to do as cartoonist. and figured that there were going to be pley of other ways that thistorm was going to be commemorated and the events we going to be talked about in books and film and this was my opportunitto add to at canon of historical records. >> brown: also onlineyou can find archive video om the hurricane,nd a report from louisiana puic broadcasting about how one ruraparish is faringour years later. and once
, they played a bigger role than that. it was a big surprise that the u.n. that they supported partition because everybody assumed they were going to be against it. and the british were especially shockedecause they thought partition was going to die at the u.n. because the british -- the russians were never supported but they did. the russians were trying to uproot the british empire in the middle east and they saw this as a wedge issue between britain and the united stat that they could play on. >> one week before gramiko gave his famous speech in the u.n., which actually if you read the text of the speech is a very noble, humane speech. we cannot fail the jewish people who have been oppressed and killed in the camps. we care for them. they must have their own state. it was a powerful, emotional almost zionist speech. and one week before dean rusk who was undersecretary of state prepared a position paper on the white house on the soviets and their position in the middle east. and he said the soviet union will support and is supporting the arab side. the soviet union will not support partition.
man and to her home, even though he ca uninvited. tougher sanctions are likely. the u.n. secity council has en meeting, but litt looks likely to ay the junta. >> she faced the court inside i i security room. burma is a proud an frightened country. no one dares to raise a public protest. the court sentenced her to ree years of jail wit hard labor. sh is 64 years old and has spent of the most -- most of the past 20 yes in prison. is sentence was reduced to 18 months. r crime was to allow an amican visitor in your house. he had swum tre uninvited. he was sentenced to seven years of hard labor. >> if she stands in the way -- ifhe could not run for office, she turned out tens of thousand of supporters at ery stopthat she made. that would be dtabilizing for em at this critical moment, as they see it coming in solidifying their rule >> hepro-democracy movement won landslide elections. they turned her intoa simple. in silencing her, ey gave her a vce tt echoes its powerful buke around the world. theuropean unionnd the united states want internatiol action against burma. >> ware doing th
. they raped and murdered civilians. this is what made darfur a household name. now the u.n. soldiers charge of keeping peace says that darfur is no longer at war. >> there is a significant reduction in the level of violence. this is largely due to the contribution of these humanitarian intervention as well as conflict prevention. >> the key issue is the political process. this involves getting criminal groups to the negotiating table. even if the fighting has died down, the region faces huge challenges. the u.n. says 2.7 million people have been displaced. 300,000 people died because of the war. today, armed groups still operating darfur, some with wings to the government. there are several peace initiatives. some hope there will be sanctions removed. many activists in america find it difficult to swallow the general's verdict. whether you agree or not depends on how you define a war. the general is saying that many of the problems in darfur are over. >> now, this is a visit to bring comfort. taiwan has invited the dalai lama and this has triggered criticism from china. >> taiwan's governme
. so most forceful action and support the congolese government and in support of all of the u.n. and nongovernmental agencies that are fighting against sexual violence in the congo. >> how is her message, though, going to be received by the governments that are in that region and also by those that are taking part of the violence? >> i think they're going t say, oh, yes, we're not supporting sexual violence. we're actually telling our soldiers and telling our commanders to end sexual violence. and there is a zero tolerance policy against sexual violence. >> but is that true? >> unfortunately not. most of the people who are responsible for sexual violence are not being prosecuted. so we need much tougher action on the part of all of the leaders and all of the commanders to end sexual vi violen violence. >> reporter: severine, we have to stop there. >> thank you very much, martin. >>> and you can find our extended coverage of the crisis in congoincluding more videos and background on the war at worldfocus.org. >>> another subject we're going to look at extensively at tonight, clim
in the cngo. so mostorceful action and support the congole government andn support of all of the u.n. and nongovemental agcies that are fighting against sexl violence in the congo. >> how is her messag thoug going to be reived by the govements that are inhat regi and also by tse that artaking part of the violence? >> i thi they're going tsay, oh, yes, we're not supportg xual vionce. wee actually telng our soldiers and telling our commanders to end sexu violence. an there is aero tolerance licy against sexual olence. >> but ithat true? >> unfortunately not. most of e people w are responsible for sexu violence are not bei prosecuted so we need much tougher action on the part ofll of the leaders and all of th commanders to end sexual vi olen violce. >> reporter:everine, we have to stop there. thank you very much, martin >>> and you can nd our extended coverage of therisis in congoincluding more videos and background on thwar at rldfocus.org. >>> another subjt we're going to lk at extensively at tonight, climate chae. the u.n. sretary-general ban ki-moon describethe problem yesterday as
the lockerbie bomber and now a call for a u.n. resolution that is condemning libya for the hero's homecoming they gave a convicted -- >> eric: a flag waving confetti throwing crowd as abdel basset mohamed al-megrahi arrived home as you can see to cheering crowds that included the leader of libya, libyan leader moammar gadhafi on the left and he was embraced by gadhafi him search a spectacle branded this morning as sickening and all of this proof that libya still has a, quote, love affair with terrorism, says senator charles schumer and is calling for u.n. security council resolution condemning libya, but goes who is the member of the security council? libya. >> jamie: good morning, everyone i'm jamie colby. >> eric: i'm eric sean and many say it was bad enough scotland decided to frae the only person ever convicted of bombing pan am flight 103 that killed 207 people, 186 of them were our fellow citizens, americans. three days later, we're finding anger over the homecoming celebration continues to resonate. across our country. joining us now on the telephone is congressman fiphil gingrey, rep
overtures to the north, principally to the u.n. ambassador, ambassador in new york, but at some point, the key was north korea suggesting two of the young women who told their families, who told al gore that bill clinton would be the man to get them out. >> exactly, the back story fascinated and consistent with what you reported yesterday, a andrea. this was a thoroughly vetted mission and what you learned from the background we received, some of the reporters received, almost from the moment these two women were taken into custody, there was a direction from the president and the secretary of state to pursue whatever channel there is could be to try to get their release. as you mentioned, could you really only do this once and through a series of phone conversations. in fact, at some point, the north koreans started to allow these two women to speak to family members at home and pass on what the north korean officials were saying to them and that, of course works get passed on to some of the washington channels. in any event, it was, in fact, the north koreans who suggested in mid ju
obama and the u.n. called for her release. the u.n. security council voiced serious concern on the conviction and its mill impact. and its political impact. >> she faced the gauntlet inside a high security prison. burma is a frightened country, and no one dare to raise a protest. these pictures were filmed secretly. the court sentenced her to three years jail with hard labor. she is 64 and has spent most of the last 20 years in detention. within minutes, the burmese government intervened and the sentence was reduced to 18 months house arrest. even the regime does not want to provoke another explosion of public anger. her crime was to allow an american visitor called john yetel into her house. he had swum there uninvited. he was sentenced to 7 years hard later. her regime wants to stop her from campaigning in elections next year. >> she stands out of the way by being under house arrest. she turned out tens of thousands of supporters at every stop she makes that. would be highly destablizing for them at this critical moment, as they see it, in solidifying their rule. >> the pr
. this violates a resolution by the u.n. and included rocket propelled grenade and missile launchers. the items were destroyed. bernie madoff's mistress is talking. he is behind bars. apparently he told lies to his wife. his mistress has written a book. earlier, she went on the record. nice to meet you. you have a book, you were the other secret. what is thhow did you first meet him? >> we met in a business meeting. there was a major donor and part of the stimulatiostipulation wat would be held by bernie madoff. it was a meeting to figure out the logistics. greta: in the book you talk about an affair with bernard madoff. that did not start off as professional. >> no, it started off as professional and then it became physical in nature after five years. greta: were you infatuated with him were interested in him? >> well, he was with me. he made it very clear that he would like to take it further. i made it clear that at that point that there was not really -- i was not really into that. i was not interested in having at a fair. gret-- an affair. greta: why was this okay? you had worked with him
this. a road map to normalizing relations between armenia and turkey is on the table. a u.n. warning. a wildfire in the mountains around los angeles is reported to have doubled in size overnight and now is threatening at least 12,000 homes. officials in california say at least more than two dozen firefighters are battling the blaze. it could be several days before it is brought under control. two firefighters have been killed since the blaze began on wednesday. he reports from los angeles. >> a rapidly moving in for no as dawn breaks over los angeles, the full extent of the wildfire is revealed. it doubled in size overnight. huge plumes of smoke hung over the area, making it more treacherous to fight the flames from the air and the ground. over the weekend, two firefighters died when their vehicle rolled off of the mountainside. >> we ask you for your understanding, for your patience as we move through this difficult time. please, prayer is for the family of error two brothers that we love. >> at least 6000 homes are under a mandatory evacuation order. emergency shelters have been se
though he came uninvited. tougher sanctions are likely. the u.n. security council is meeting, but little is likely to be persuade. we have this report. >> she faced the core inside a high-security rangoon prison. burdett is a frightened country -- she faced the courts. no one dared to raise a frightened protest -- burma is a friend country. three years jail with hard labour. she is 64 and has spent most of the last 20 years in detention. within minutes, the burmese government intervenes, and the sentence was reduced them 18 months. even the regime does not want to provoke another outbreak of public am correct. crime was to allow an american visitor called john yettaw into her house. he swam there. -- curb crime was that. >> free to wander the country -- her crime was that. tens of thousands of supporters at every stop she makes, and that would be highly destabilizing for them at this critical moment as they see it in solidifying their role. >> aung san suu kyi had a landslide victory in the 1990's, but the government refused to give up power. in jailing her, they wanted to silencer, but
bolton. former u.n. ambassador and fox news contributor. before i get to north korea and all that stuff, i just have a few generic questions about being a diplomat. first off, i have to ask you, is it the coolest job in the world? >> i wouldn't necessarily say so. depends on where you are and who you are dealing with. there are a lot of interesting moments, that is for sure. >> greg: is it true that you get to choose your own art for your own office like if you wanted apy cas picasso. >> you get to choose the art for your residence but it is all within a u.s. government budget let me assure you of that. >> all laugh valuable information lamps all the -- all lava lamps all the time. >> whatever you can get people to give you for free. >> greg: what is your favorite country to go to because you are obviously traveling a lot. >> well, i have always enjoyed going to moss cue. moscow. i went there quite a bit when i was undersecretary for arms control. i went to marriott and they always put me in the same room, why do you think they did that? [ laughter ] >> what a lazy lugger. >> they could
, he looks a little stronger and more in control. but the pressure of new u.n. sanctions and, i am told, fresh pressure from china may be forcing him to be engaged with the united states. at this moment, it may be more than a human story. north korea may be ready to make another attempt at coming in from the cold. bbc news. , washington. >> the journalists have been welcomed by the secretary of state hillary clinton. she is in kenya where she strongly criticized the government's failure to prosecute those responsible for the violence that followed the 2007 election. officials in northwestern pakistan say the wife of a taliban leader has been killed in a suspected american missile attack. i drone that attack the relative of baitullah mehsud near the afghan border. the iraqi government has announced it will take down all the blast walls that separate the baghdad communities within four days. the wall sprung up at the height of sectarian violence. many say the walls made the city unrecognizable, but safer. after seven weeks of post- election protests and the people, mahmoud ahmadinejad has
know what their feelings are. under the headquarters agreement that the u.s. signed for the u.n., he, just like president ahmadinejad, can come and participate in u.n. business. when he arrives, he will be given diplomatic community, he will be allowed to speak at the u.n. hopefully he will not be allowed to travel outside the confines of manhattan. greta: why is this killer such a celebrity in libya? why did he get a hero's welcome? >> the libyans have never really conceded that they were responsible for him. that is really what i think we should have been doing to go back to putting pressure on the british, i don't see much evidence that we did anything except to go through the motions. that is a subject for congressional hearings. let's hear from the secretary of state what she and her colleagues did. greta: you talked about the settlement, it was $2.7 billion. it seems to me that if this is chump change, you can do anything to get rid of a problem. this sounds like a guilty conscience. >> that is correct. he got a lot in exchange for the settlement and giving up nuclear weapons.
flight 103, flying to new york and with us now, former u.s. ambassador to the u.n. and a fox news contributor, ambassador john bolten with his take, good morning, always good to see you. >> good morning, glad to be here. >> do you think there was a deal. >> well, the evidence at the time of the -- london has is -- "the times" of london has are two letters, from jack straw the then justice secretary in the u.k. government, basically saying that what he called in his letter overwhelming british interest should dictate that abdel basset mohamed al-megrahi the terrorist would be covered by an agreement they were working on, with libya, prisoner transfers and shortly after that, shift in position by jack straw, libya approved a very significant deal for british petroleum and it's important to understand, jack straw had been foreign secretary in the blair government, just a few years before, and he was somebody in the multi-involved in british foreign relations, entertaining to the scottish authority -- explaining to the scottish authorities what was going an and it is as dispositive ev
that this does not happen. he should be restricted to the u.n. district only to do u.n. work and not have any meeting our residents outside of that. >> we cannot understand how he can be allowed to roam through new jersey or anywhere else in america. he honored terrorist that took american lives. shepard: as the host of the u.n., the u.s. is expected to allow any leader into the country. the state that he wants to stay in is within 25 miles. it will cost you more to get through your grocery list. if you want to cry in your beer, that is going up. summer is almost gone. millions of people tfind their plans canceled by a tropical storm. we will get this from the extreme weather center. we will hear from the experts next. hñí shepard: during this recession, one of the few spots has been the price of food which has dropped. this is a trend that economists tell us will not last long. the two largest brewers have announced plans to raise prices for beer even though sales are flat. take a look at the start, the cost of a cold one has already been going up over the past year even as consumer
." >> greg: that is true. what is former u.n. ambassador john bolton think about the only people he terrified more than spineless dictators were those that wet their pants at the mention of his name. we are thrilled to have back on the program, john bolton. he knows protocol like i know alcohol. always a pleasure to have you on the show. i want to talk to you about the libyan president. he is coming to new york for a u.n. meeting and staying at a tent on the front lawn of a house in new jersey owned by the libyan mission and some of the neighbors aren't happy with this. how can he do this? what is your take on this? >> he is the only head of state who doesn't want to live in a hotel. i heard he has done this as he travels around the world. in one case they cleared the top floor of his embassy in a country and put the tent inside the top floor. i guess they will let him sleep out on the grass this time. >> greg: this reminds me of when i was a kid and i lived in the suburbs and i wanted to go camping so my parents let me put a tent in the living room. this guy never really grew up. he likes to
in manhattan for a hotel where qaddafi can stay during the u.n. general assembly. i do not know what that means. they do not want him in new jersey, right? you talked to a new jersey senator. >> this sounds sort of convoluted. i am drawing the line in the sand at this point. this mansion is only 10 minutes from my home. neil: is it really? what is it? it as a tax-free status. >> it is a mission to the u.n.. when the had sanctions against them, the ambassador to the u.n. was only allowed to go there every other weekend. through the internal wisdom of bush 43, they took libby of the state-sponsored terror list and gave them open access to his mansion. neil: it was dilapidated. >> it was until two weeks ago. neil: the tent was there. i think he was going to take the tent with him. the state department is saying it is not going to happen. if he is in new york or a hotel near new york and not in your neck of the woods, you were insulted that he is here? >> no question. what i said last week when i was with you, libya is winning. state-sponsored terrorism is winning. this becomes even more personal.
in a roadside bomb attack on a patrol in eastern baghdad. a new report from the u.n.'s nuclear watchdog found iran has not suspended its nuclear activities, but it has allowed greater monitoring of nuclear facilities by u.n. inspectors. still, the report from the international atomic energy agency said, there remain a number of outstanding issues which give rise to concerns." iran's top representative to the i.a.e.a. called the assessment a "fabrication". the u.s. participates in six- party talks next week to consider new sanctions on iran. in the latest political developments in iran, president mahmoud ahmadinejad stepped up pressure on opposition leaders today, for the first time, demanding their prosecution for what he called orchestrating post-election unrest, with the help of foreign enemies. he spoke to a crowd gathered at tehran university. >> serious confrontation has to be against the leaders and key elements of 9 incidents. these secondhand elements have to be dealt with islamic mercy. don't give protection to the main elements and punish the deceived and secondhand elements. >> bro
terrorism in the united states. number three, february 5th, 2003, secretary state powell sells the u.n. security council of iraq's concealed weapons including 18 mobile biological weapons laboratories justifying a u.n. or u.s. first strike. many in the u.n. are doubtful. months later, much of the information proves untrue. february 7th, 2003, two days later, anti-war demonstrations protesting the imminent invasion of iraq continue to take place around the globe. >> take some time to prepare for the emergency. >> homeland security secretary ridge cites credible threats by al qaeda and raises the terror alert level to orange. three days after that, prior administrator who had become the acting head of fema after the hurricane katrina disaster advises americans to stock up on plastic sheeting and duct tape to protect themselves against radiological or biological attack. july 23rd, 200 3shgs the white house admits that the cia, months before the president's state of the union address, expressed strong doubts about the claim that iraq had attempted to buy uranium from niger. on the 24th, th
" tonight. >>> what is it about former u.n. ambassador john bodilten laughi at him on television? that's in the "sideshow." i'm laughing with her. >>> we begin with what happened today, today's better than expected unemployment jobs figures, what does it mean for president obama. in a moment nbc's chief white house correspondent chuck todd will join us. but right up front, susan page, washington bureau chief for "usa today." you write the big stories for the people. thank you for joining us on television. you should be on television. the "usa today" is right there on every hotel doorstep. >> you can buy it at newsstands. >> i know, too. you always sell here. let me ask you what do you make of the president's optimistic tone? let's watch the president today around 1:00 in the afternoon east coast time talking up the economy for the first time in a while. >> we're pointed in the right direction. we're losing jobs at less than half the rate we were when i took office. we've pulled the financial system back from the brink and a rising market is restoring value to those 401(k)s that are the
for a month to establish whether she shld benefit from inmuent as she s working r the u.n en she was arerrested. she resign last week to fight the case. >> i want to change the law. the law in sudan not much with the institution of zad and not much with human rights. >> many women havbeen flogged for wearing trousers over the st 20 years. the case has attracted a lot of atteion, and one poin over 100 protestors were chased away. theybroke up theemonstration usintear gas, and they stped us filming. but the number of wom and the reacti of the authories show that tiss becoming a realest case forwomen's rits in sudan. "bbcews," khartou >> a thir man has died of new monday playing in a chese to under complete quarantine in days. they are killing rats and fleece to stop it from reading. it can kiln 24 hours. in thailand passenger ple has crashed into a disused control to your,illing the lot and injurying 10 people. the flight skidd on a rainy runway just after landing. mostn boorpped were tousts. a juvenile crt in iraq has sentenced a 16-ar-old girl for 17 years in prison for an attem
with the u.n. to get that changed and i will call as well. we met with a central banker while we were there, and they talked about the various issues, the sanctions are creating for them and again i'm going back to the cpa because if we end up having the train wreck that on the present course will occur, okay, darfur, as terrible as it is, is going to get far worse and is going to spread to. so we met with our intelligence agencies and i know many folks here have done that here. the fact is there is no evidence today in spite of the atrocities we all are aware of there is no evidence that sudan is involved as a state sponsor of terror. none. so the unintended consequences of that defined term existing life think may be hurting us as it relates to these other efforts, and i just wonder since there is no evidence of that and since we understand the importance of this comprehensive peace agreement achieving as it is desired in 2011i am wondering if we are again on one of those paths of unintended consequences and i wonder if he might respond to that. >> you're exactly correct there is no evide
. what is happening on that front is that there is a u.n.-led process. it is led by the united nations assistance mission for iraq, which has a process. it came out with a big report that until now has not been made public, but is starting to circulate in ever wider circles, so aner or later you'll have a couple on your desk. it's 500 pages, so good luck to you. it's good reading. but this report is actually remarkable for the in-depth research it displays on the social and economic and legal and jurisdictional and political history of individual districts in these disputed territories. and for suggesting ways of building confidence in these areas that might then lead to a political solution which can only come from the parties, the stakeholders themselves, and cannot be produced by the united nations. as the u.n. makes very clear. and so this report was released in april and has led to the creation of a task force in june, which has just been given a little bit new life, but sort of sputtering along without a lot of energy, when prime minister maliki went to the north to meet their le
, providing the dictator was a badly needed propaganda victory, according to former u.n. ambassador john bolton. >> obviously bringing a former president to north korea is a lifeline of legitimacy for kim jung il's regime and other owing states are watching this very -- other rogue states are watching this carefully to our detriment. bringing in somebody like president clinton who was deeply involved in dealing with north korea on its nuclear weapons program during his presidency hopelessly confuses those issues and gives kim jong il a leg up at a time when the regime is under a lot of pressure. laura ling and union that lee were working for al gore's current t.v. when they were taken in march and sentenced to 20 years hard labor. kim jung il ordered the two women pardoned during bill clinton's visit after his wife, the secretary of state, asked for amnesty. >> the two families expressed great remorse for this incident. i think everyone is very sorry that it happened. >> the north korean news agency, the official state news agency, has reported that the plane has already taken off and th
of sudan to support the operations of the u.n. high commissioner for litigious and international organization for migration so they can undertake the vital task of certifying any returns and paprika and voluntary. the violence we've seen recently in darfur recently in pockets of the south are a jarring symbol of legacy of negative trends that develop for saddam conflicts and persist to this day. the absence of common good governance and abundance of weapons and unresolved grievances. we must strengthen government and community's ability to deal with tension constructively at non-violently. the alternative is a failed state where chaos will brain. before concluding on behalf of usaid i want to express appreciation to senator coffman, member of this committee who recently in a statement on the senate floor paid tribute to john grindle, one of 91 agency employees who have lost their lives in the performance of their duties overseas. in honor of john grenfell usaid is replacing the stuff carow word which will recognize usaid employees who make significant contributions to the morale
carrying weapons bound for iran has been seized by the uae. this violates a resolution by the u.n. and included rocket propelled grenade and missile launchers. the items were destroyed. bernie madoff's mistress is talking. he is behind bars. apparently he told lies to his wife. his mistress has written a book. earlier, she went on the record. nice to meet you. you have a book, you were the other secret. what is thhow did you first meet him? >> we met in a business meeting. there was a major donor and part of the stimulatiostipulation wat would be held by bernie madoff. it was a meeting to figure out the logistics. greta: in the book you talk about an affair with bernard madoff. that did not start off as professional. >> no, it started off as professional and then it became physical in nature after five years. greta: were you infatuated with him were interested in him? >> well, he was with me. he made it very clear that he would like to take it further. i made it clear that at that point that there was not really -- i was not really into that. i was not interested in having at a fa
by the u.n. and included rocket propelled grenade and missile launchers. the items were destroyed. bernie madoff's mistress is talking. he is behind bars. apparently he told lies to his wife. his mistress has written a book. earlier, she went on the record. nice to meet you. you have a book, you were the other secret. what is thhow did you first meet him? >> we met in a business meeting. there was a major donor and part of the stimulatiostipulation wat would be held by bernie madoff. it was a meeting to figure out the logistics. greta: in the book you talk about an affair with bernard madoff. that did not start off as professional. >> no, it started off as professional and then it became physical in nature after five years. greta: were you infatuated with him were interested in him? >> well, he was with me. he made it very clear that he would like to take it further. i made it clear that at that point that there was not really -- i was not really into that. i was not interested in having at a fair. gret-- an affair. greta: why was this okay? you had worked with him for five years and then
that ahmadinejad victory. iranian news sources reported that u.n. secretary-general congratulated on his so-called victory and his spokesperson said he did so. she now says the letter merely, quote -- sean: i'm sure that president ahmadinejad is eager to cooperate with the u.n. and the rest of the international community. and timely tonight, good news for fans, former ohio representative james traficant, the congressman convicted of bribery, racketeering and fraud is now set to be released from a minnesota jail on september 2. the congressman will receive a hero's welcome, a welcome dinner is already sold out. for those of you wondering what these people are celebrating, well, let's look at traficant in action. >> i have enough pressure on me, not only people leaning on me that don't smell good -- you smell good. >> my throat is sore. and i'm having rectal disorders, as a matter of fact. >> if they lie again i'm going to kick them in the crotch. >> you had an f.b.i. director named hoover, no against to costdressers who was a trans investigate diet. beam me up. >> lot of time studying your c
laugh? mention john boulton, bush's hawkish u.n. ambassador who you remember needed a recess appointment to get the job back in 2005. here she is on cnn yesterday defending bill's rescue mission in north korea. >> it was not in any way an official government mission. >> but john boulton, the former u.n. ambassador -- should i even go on? >> i'm sorry. no, you really shouldn't. >> he said this is rewarding hostage taking. why is he wrong? because you -- they effectively took hostages -- >> we've done this so many times before. it had nothing to do with our policy. and of course, you know, you mention somebody who, heavens, if president obama walked on water, he'd say he couldn't swim. >> wow, good line, good defense, good offense. john boulton, by the way, was one of the people who took us into war and would love to do it again. >>> next, a shake-up in the governor's mansion down in south carolina. the first lady of south carolina put out a statement, a public statement today, that she was moving out of the governor's mansion leaving mark sanford, the governor, behind. she and her four so
the world. i'm fareed zakaria. on today's show we start with the first television interview to israel's u.n. ambassador to the united states, michael oren. a previous historian previously in the military, now in washington. then we show you hilary clinton with yours truly in the moderator's role. >>> finally in nairobi, the prime minister of kenya. >>> when barack obama came into office, many in america and around the world hoped he would breathe life into the prospects between a peace deal between israel and the palestinians. obama quickly appointed a man on the issue, former senator george mitchell, who had negotiated the peace accords in the islands. it is considered by some to be the most right wing in memory, as is the new government. the prime minister netanyahu had been fiercely critical of any kind of palestinian state. his former minister had called for what some had characterized as leaders from israel. obama and netanyahu have clashd to expand settlements over the west bank. there has been some forward movement. he did accept the idea of a palestinian state about a month ago. the
they were rigged to ensure that ahmadinejad victory. iranian news sources reported that u.n. secretary-general congratulated on his so-called victory and his spokesperson said he did so. she now says the letter merely, quote -- sean: i'm sure that president ahmadinejad is eager to cooperate with the u.n. and the rest of the international community. and timely tonight, good news for fans, former ohio representative james traficant, the congressman convicted of bribery, racketeering and fraud is now set to be released from a minnesota jail on september 2. the congressman will receive a hero's welcome, a welcome dinner is already sold out. for those of you wondering what these people are celebrating, well, let's look at traficant in action. >> i have enough pressure on me, not only people leaning on me that don't smell good -- you smell good. >> my throat is sore. and i'm having rectal disorders, as a matter of fact. >> if they lie again i'm going to kick them in the crotch. >> you had an f.b.i. director named hoover, no against to costdressers who was a trans investigate diet. beam me up
by the uae. this violates a resolution by the u.n. and included rocket propelled grenade and missile launchers. the items were destroyed. bernie madoff's mistress is talking. he is behind bars. apparently he told lies to his wife. his mistress has written a book. earlier, she went on the record. nice to meet you. you have a book, you were the other secret. what is thehow did you first meet him? >> we met in a business meeting. there was a major donor and part of the stimulationstipulation was that it would be held by bernie madoff. it was a meeting to figure out the logistics. greta: in the book you talk about an affair with bernard madoff. that did not start off as professional. >> no it started off as professional and then it became physical in nature after five years. greta: were you infatuated with him were interested in him? >> well, he was with me. he made it very clear that he would like to take it further. i made it clear that at that point that there was not really -- i was not really into that. i was not interested in having at a fair. greta-- an affair. greta: why was this
. was justice done? >>> iran makes new concessions. it allows u.n. inspectors to visit a new nuclear reactor. what were those inspectors likely to have learned? >>> amid scattered reports of violence, afghanis vote. tonight we focus on issues including widespread government corruption and taliban control. plus a look at the potential for voter fraud. >>> and an enduring environmental mystery, disappring bees. now londoners are trying to do something about it. >>> good evening, i'm martin savidge. we begin tonight with a story that raises fundamental questions. what's compassionate, what's just, and how do you balance the two? we wondered about that today after seeing these pictures -- a libyan man convicted of murdering 270 people. the worst terror act in modern times, the bombing of pan am flight 103. the incident over lockerbie, scotland, shortly before 1988. because this is our lead discussion, we made it our lead focus r"ectonight. damon green of itn has our report. >> reporter: this used to be an aircraft, and for those who boarded as passengers, there was no way out. today the man conv
but the u.n. said, no he should be there and he should do it. so i think -- so that opened myself into thinking that there's some possibilities of the civil society groups. now, they can be having a real impact in some context and there's real things which is called arab commission for human rights on a parallel in the american commission or the african commission whereby there will be enough people to come to sit together and where the state fails, maybe the discourse in going there to complain to that commission. one setback which i really wanted activists to focus on the emergence of a group are the human rights council which i just passed in geneva with russia, china, cuba legitimate human rights when they come out from the middle east and they want to participate in their political view. there was some kind of lining up of 12 or 20 cubans and others and they were lining up and just praising each other saying oh, you have done a great job. you participated very well. yeah in the world view it become -- what do you call it an abrasive view. so there's some opportunities opening
? former u.n. ambassador and author here live with the answers. gretchen: and the man convict the in the bombing of pan am flight 103 gets a hero's welcome. the leader of that country won't get the same when he comes to the united states. one lawmaker who will stop at nothing to keep c qaddafi out joins us. eric: and if you're heading out of work to drop off the kids, you can still listen to us on sirius satellite radio. brian: i listen all the time. where advanced degrees advance the quality of life. what heals me? girls' night out. and for damage from acid reflux disease, my nexium. announcer: for many, one prescription nexium pill a day can heal damage to the esophagus that acid reflux disease may cause over time. and nexium can provide 24-hour heartburn relief. headache, diarrhea, and abdominal pain are possible side effects of nexium and other serious stomach conditions may still exist. announcer: ask your doctor about the healing purple pill. learn how you can save online. if you can't afford your medication, astrazeneca may be able to help. there's no one exactly like y
laughing her butt off at some the former bush guy, this former u.s. ambassador to the u.n. said. laughing because somebody had made fun of her shusband's success at bringing back those two american reporters from north korea. what did you make of that? chuck first and then susan. >> i think it's so great to see unity among bill and hillary and the president heartily laughing without any cue or pr involved, laughing at the absurdity of anybody saying that wasn't a good news piece for america. >> can i tell you, i was talking to one white house official who says, hey, take a look at this week as a whole. we've rescued two americans from north korea. we were able to get -- break an ethnic barrier in the supreme court and they got -- >> nine republican votes. >> nine republican votes. it was a bigger vote than alito got. oh, by the way, we may have killed the single most threatening terrorist short of osama bin laden with that guy from the taliban that it looks like that they got and is dead, and they say, you know, intelligence will show that this guy maybe was more menacing and more of a pr
, to gadhafi. it makes lockerbie never have happened. now remember, gadhafi is coming to the u.n. at the end of december. he's going to roll in there and gives his speech and he comes in. i remember when we got a police escort spontaneously when we were on our way from a memorial we held at the pan-am building to the u.n., and now what am i going to see, a police escort to protect gadhafi? >> let me tell you what the lawyer has to say. he released this statement moments ago. bear with us. >> to those victims' relatives who can hear me say this, they continue to have my sincere sympathy for their unimaginable loss that they have suffered. to those who bid me ill will, the only thing i can see is that i do not return to you. >> well, he wants -- >> it's a little hard to understand. >> well, he wants you to know that he has your sympathy -- i mean you have his sympathy, really. >> really? really? thanks a lot. i don't want his sympathy. that is ridiculous. he's just glad he got out. what does he care about people's sympathy? my goodness, the fact is, the man was a convicted mass murderer and a
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